About GNOWP

For 35 years, the Greater New Orleans Writing Project at the University of New Orleans has been a site of the National Writing Project, an organization dedicated to improving writing and the teaching of writing throughout the Greater New Orleans area and the nation. We achieve our goals through teacher collaboration, inquiry into best practices, and support of teacher-writers and student-writers in New Orleans area classrooms.
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October 18
9:30 am- 12:30 pm
University of New Orleans, LA 334

Write @ UNO 2014

GNOWP invites New Orleans area students to join us for the 2014 Write @ UNO workshops! Open to all students from 7th-12th grade, the Write @ UNO workshops help students prepare their creative work for submission to the Scholastic Writing Awards–or just improve their writing. Students will have access to workshops led by professional writers Read More

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GNOWP BLOG

Creativity

On Creativity

Sarah DeBacher | October 21, 2013

This entry comes to us from GNOWP allstar Ari Zeiger. Ari attended the Summer Institute in 2012, co-facilitated it in 2013, and teaches writing (brilliantly!) at Delgado Community College. ### In this short video, Sir Ken Robinson discourses on a range of subjects (from creativity to education to imagination). At last count, I’ve watched the Read More

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May There Be Pens, May There Be Paper

Sarah DeBacher | May 21, 2013

“Writing is both a challenge and an extreme exigency—that is, it is both called forth by and constitutes the trauma. But writing both exceeds and is inadequate to the task; it is both unavoidable and impossible.”— Peter and Maureen Daly Goggin, Trauma and the Teaching of Writing (2005).

In my attic there is box containing hundreds of magnets I collected from curb-side refrigerators after Hurricane Katrina. I’d been fortunate enough to have a home to return to, but when I was allowed to return to New Orleans in October of 2005, the city was virtually unrecognizable. The visual landscape was so disrupted, so disruptive, that it made its way into horrifying underwater nightmares I couldn’t shake. Even when I dreamt lucidly, I was unable to wake myself, my subconscious seemingly aware that the waking-world would provide no comfort. What on earth was this? How on earth could this have happened? I spent my days in a kind of stupor, and yet the collection of refrigerator magnets and documentation of their sites gave me a kind of purpose. I had no idea what I would do with the magnets. I still don’t. I just needed to do something.

School began. I got busy with the work of teaching—an immense comfort and immense burden, both. My classes took place online, but internet connectivity was spotty, at best. Regular power outages plunged us into darkness and we shuffled out onto stoops to visit with others who’d returned, to share stories about how we’d “made out in the storm.”

My students had it much worse than I did. Before that semester began, I’d grown accustomed to the usual range of excuses for late work: dead grandmothers (so many dead grandmothers!), flat tires, printers without ink, etc. But this semester the excuses punched me in the gut. “I lost my job, my home, everything. Can I please have an extension on Essay 2?” Yes. Yes! I remember feeling like my every teacherly choice that semester was Really Effing Important. What would I assign? How could I respond ethically and empathetically to students whose lives had been—like mine—upended entirely? (I wrote about the experience of teaching after Hurricane Katrina in an article that appeared in Reflections in 2007.)

Today I’ve been thinking about the texts I produced in the immediate aftermath of Katrina (although I’ve learned that a more accurate way of putting it is “in the aftermath of the failure of the federal levees.) I’ve been thinking about that box of magnets and the blogging I did and the writing I assigned, and the emails I sent, and how my words helped me heal but also plunged me right back into the depths of despair, too.

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Teaching Children(,) Grazed by Bullets

Sarah DeBacher | May 13, 2013

This weekend was intense in ways expected and not. The expected territory came on Saturday, when GNOWP welcomed ten of the twelve teachers who will be joining us during this year’s Summer Institute. We gathered in the Liberal Arts building on the campus of the University of New Orleans to write together, to build some community.
Early on, two of our teachers—Jeanne Patrick and Allison Lowe—shared a standout moment from the written conversation they’d just had. Jeanne had written about the importance of finding ways to make her students feel safe so they could then take brave risks in their writing. We all nodded in agreement. For risky writing to take place, there must be safety.

Risky writing is the brave, truth-telling stuff through which we do more than poke dead things with sticks—we wrestle with why they died; we take a good, close look at the effed-up fact that we will all, someday, (today, maybe,) die too; we lay them to rest, eulogizing worms and birds, and the dark stuff bubbling up in the children who abuse them, with an empathy achievable only through deep consideration and an acknowledgement that the First Thought might not be the right one. Risky writing does not pose easy questions or provide simple answers. It plows past platitudes and kisses complexity. It dives right into the depths of “I don’t know,” the only sure thing being that some discovery will be made, that the heart of the writer will be changed.

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Greater New Orleans Writing Project

"By writing about traumatic, stressful or emotional events, participants were significantly more likely to have fewer illnesses and be less affected by trauma. Participants ultimately spent less time in the hospital, enjoyed lower blood pressure and had better liver functionality than their counterparts. "

Science Shows Something Surprising About People Who Love to Write

mic.com

Writers have a serious advantage over the rest of us.

Today at 10:34am • No Comments

Submissions are open for the 2015 Scholastic Writing Awards! Visit our webpage to learn how to enter!

Regional Programs | Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

www.artandwriting.org

About Us • Regional Programs Southeast Louisiana Writing Region 3 Steps to Enter 1. REGISTERCreate an account at https://www.artandwriting.org/Login.2. UPLOAD ALL YOUR WORKS Once you have logged in, follow the instructions to upload all of your submissions into the system. Every category has specifi…

Sep 16th 2:47pm • No Comments

Greater New Orleans Writing Project shared a link.

Remembering Eric Trethewey

bayoumagazine.org

Today on the Bayou blog we honor the memory of Eric Trethewey, nationally acclaimed poet.

Sep 16th 1:41pm • No Comments

"Teaching should be one of the most revered and prestigious professions in our society — considering how it shapes the future — and it should be one in which the diversity of our society is reflected."

How to Diversify Teaching - Room for Debate - NYTimes.com

www.nytimes.com

What can be done to make a career in education more attractive to men and people of color?

Sep 15th 2:43pm • No Comments